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Introduction
Nervous System and  Spinal Cord
Types of cells 
Neuron 
Conclusion
Activities
Bibliography
Glossary
Standards
The CNS and PNS

     The nervous system has two different major parts. The two parts are the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous. The central nervous system or the CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord. All together, the brain and the spinal cord serve the nervous system's command station. When the sensory input reaches the CNS, the spinal cord and the brain figure outs what it exactly means. After, they quickly orders out the body parts that needs to move faster.
     Everything else but the CNS it is known as the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system or PNS contains the nerves, which leave the brain and the spinal cord and travel to certain areas of the body. The peripheral nervous system's main job is to send information gathered by the body's sensory receptors to the CNS as quickly as possible. Once the CNS has understood the information, the PNS will relay the specific orders back out the body. These nerves which carry information in a way of nerve impulses to and from the brain are called cranial nerves. The nerves that carry impulse to and are carrying information from the spine are called spinal nerves. 
     The PNS has two important parts. They are the motor division and the sensory division. The sensory division collects the impulses from the sensory receptors in areas like skin, muscles, and organs, and also carries those impulses through the nerves to the CNS. The motor division collects the outgoing messages from the CNS and delivers them to the appropriate body organs, telling them what to do. The motor division does the opposite from the sensory division.