A moment in Gwinnett's Black History: GCPS celebrates the Hooper Renwick School









A moment in Gwinnett's Black History: GCPS celebrates the Hooper Renwick School

Professor Marshall M. Hooper and his wife opened a school for African American students in the 1930s. At the time, many black children were educated at home, at their churches, or in small schools like the Hooper School. In the 1940s, the county had more than 70 small community schools, including 12 small schools serving African American students.


Professor Marshall M. Hooper



Hooper Renwick School


In 1958, a bond was passed to build two larger, consolidated schools for black schoolchildren. The Renwick family donated land for what would be called Hooper Renwick School. (Hull Elementary in Duluth also was built at the time.)
In the late 1960s, black students integrated into their neighborhood schools around the county. Hooper Renwick School closed in 1968.

The proud legacy of Hooper Renwick School lives on in Gwinnett County through a thriving African American community and the school system's many African American students-- some of whom are children, grandchildren, even great-grandchildren of former Hooper Renwick students.

Hooper Renwick faculty and graduates


Today the Hooper Renwick School building is in use once more as a special education facility.