Author in You - Neal Shusterman Classroom Activities









AKS & Activities for Author In You
Neal Shusterman

File with same info as below:

AKS Activities for Shusterman.doc


AKS (Sixth, Seventh, Eighth Grade):
¨ prewrite, draft, revise and edit writing to improve fluency, content, organization and style (writing process) (GPS, ITBS, ACT) (6LA_E2005-34) (7LA_E2005-38); (GPS, ITBS, PSAT, ACT, CE) (8LA_E2005-25)
¨ edit for spelling, fragments and run-on sentences (GPS, ITBS, ACT) (6LA_E2005-35) (7LA_E2005-39); (GPS, ITBS, PSAT, ACT) (8LA_E2005-26)
¨ produce writing (multi-paragraph, expository, persuasive and technical) that establishes an organizational structure appropriate to purpose, audience, context and type of composition (GPS) (6LA_E2005-36) (7LA_E2005-40) (8LA_E2005-27)
¨ use writing handbooks, grammar check and references to edit usage and mechanics (GPS, ITBS, ACT) (6LA_E2005-37) (7LA_E2005-41); (GPS, ITBS, PSAT, ACT, CE) (8LA_E2005-28)
¨ write, combine and vary sentences to match purpose and audience (GPS, ITBS, ACT, CE) (6LA_E2005-44) (7LA_E2005-48); (GPS, ITBS, PSAT, CE) (8LA_E2005-35)
¨ use available technology to assist in writing (GPS) (6LA_E2005-45) (7LA_E2005-50) (8LA_E2005-36)
Sixth, Seventh
¨ develop a clear topic with examples and details (GPS, ITBS, ACT) (6LA_E2005-38) (7LA_E2005-42)
¨ use transitions between ideas and paragraphs (GPS, ACT) (6LA_E2005-39) (7LA_E2005-43)
Sixth, Eighth
¨ establish voice through tone, word choice, rhetorical devices and literary devices (GPS, ACT, CE) (6LA_E2005-43); (PSAT, CE) (8LA_E2005-34)
Sixth
¨ write stories with setting, characters and plot which engage the reader (GPS, CE) (6LA_E2005-41)
Seventh
¨ use parallel sentence structures (ITBS, ACT) (7LA_E2005-49)
Eighth
¨ develop a central idea with examples, illustrations, facts and details (GPS, PSAT, ACT, CE) (8LA_E2005-30)
¨ write logical and effective transitions between ideas and paragraphs (GPS, PSAT, ACT, CE) (8LA_E2005-31)

Neal talks about the importance of revision. He revises his story six times before it is sent to the publisher for more revisions. He also talks about his strategy when he starts his story. Use his strategy of writing and revision as a model for the students’ writing process. (Note: Have the student keep a copy of their writing at each step in a folder for evaluation.)
1. After gathering ideas, the student will write the first draft long hand on paper. (Copy 1)
2. Take the first writing and type the story into a word processing program. Making any revisions that seem to improve the story. Print two copies of the story. Put one copy in a folder. (Copy 2)
3. Revise copy 2 to write, combine and vary sentences to match purpose and audience. Make changes in computer. Print two copies of the story. Put one copy in the folder. (Copy 3)
4. Revise copy 3 to develop a clear topic with examples and details. Print two copies of the story. Put one copy in the folder. (Copy 4)
5. Revise copy 4 to develop effective transitions between ideas and paragraphs. Print two copies of the story. Put one copy in the folder. (Copy 5)
6. Depending on specific grade level AKS, revise copy 5 to meet one of the AKS not covered in the other revisions. Print two copies of the story. Put one copy in the folder. (Copy 6)
7. Revise copy 6 to edit for spelling, fragments and run-on sentences. Also in this revision use writing handbooks, grammar checks and references to edit usage and mechanics.
8. Print two copies of the story. Turn in one copy to the teacher (editor) for corrections.
9. Get all six copies. Starting with the first story reread each revision. Critique the revisions. Some questions to answer:
a. Did writing the first one on paper help?
b. Was there improvement in each revision?
c. Did modeling Neal’s writing process improve the composition?
d. Are there things to change to make revisions more effective?
10. Discuss the critiques this writing process.
11. With the returned copy, make one more revision, enter the changes, and print. This will be the finished copy used for publishing.