Economic education encourages personal stewardship for students









Economic education encourages personal stewardship for students

In the news and around kitchen tables across America, homeownership, mortgages, and loan payments are much discussed… so, too, in classrooms around Gwinnett County. For Peachtree Ridge High seniors in Dr. Elfi Funk’s 1st period Honors Economics class, compound interest has the room buzzing as the students calculate payments on a 15-year and 30-year mortgage.

With a question about foreclosure, Dr. Funk draws a lesson from the headlines.“They need to know these things,” she says, noting that current events make economic education all the more relevant for her students, who soon will be out on their own. Grade-appropriate lessons like this one build on each other from kindergarten to graduation, ensuring that GCPS students have a strong foundation in financial literacy before they enter the marketplace as adults.

These lessons are taught in a historical context and woven into related lessons in math, political science, and geography. Whether it’s older students watching the highs and lows of the stock market game or kindergartners building their own classroom economy, economic education is benefitting the next generation of entrepreneurs, business professionals, taxpayers, and homeowners. Click here for a round-up of classroom activities in economic education.

Gwinnett’s comprehensive, K–12 implementation of economic education has not gone unnoticed. GCPS recently received the Program of Excellence Award from the Georgia Council on Economic Education.“It’s a great time for us to be talking about the economy,” says Debbie Daniell, GCPS’ curriculum director for Social Studies. “It’s also a great time for parents to be involved in their students’ economic education, sharing everyday lessons that can last a lifetime.”